26 Best Utah Hikes for Kids

Following the cairns in Elephant Canyon (Canyonlands National Park – Needles District)

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Hiking as a family was one of the most looked forward to and rewarding activities as our kids were growing up. Utah is one the best places to find hikes to do with kids, especially when you are just beginning to have them hike on their own. Whether your kids are 2 or 12 (or older), It’s never too late to get out on the trails as a family. In this post, you’ll find 26 Family-Friendly Utah hikes and all you need to get out on the trails that will have your kids asking when is the next time you’ll go for a hike.

Zebra Canyon Grand-Staircase-Escalante National Monument

Tips for your Family-Friendly Adventure

Change Your Mindset

Remember that the first few times out on the trail will set the precedent for how enjoyable your little ones will think hiking is. You need to be ok with not hiking at your usual pace and let your child(ren) be excited about being in nature. The hike will become just as much about the journey as it will be about the destination. Let them take the time to investigate that hidey-hole on the side of the trail, check out the stream, or examine the bugs or other wildlife. Take breaks as needed. Bringing along friends is always a good idea. It helps the miles sail by.

Sheets Gulch-Capitol Reef National Park

Plan

You want your first experiences to be a success, so plan on a trail well inside your child’s capabilities. They will leave feeling proud of themselves for reaching the goal and see the joy of reaching a cool destination. When selecting a hike for novice hikers, what they experience on the journey should excite them to see more. I always look for trails with water features (streams, ponds, waterfalls, and best of all, swimming holes), cool places to explore like arches, caves, old car wrecks or ruins, or anything that provides that sense of discovery for your kids.

Pleasant Creek – Capitol Reef National Park

Prepare

Really this goes for any hike, but when you are hiking with kids, even a slight discomfort can turn into a big deal. Especially if they are already out of their comfort zone.

When hiking, always be sure to pack the Ten Essentials. Not only are these important for emergencies, but they make great tools or motivators on the trail.

  1. Navigation (map and compass) We have these features on our phones. Using an app like Alltrails can even enable us to follow our progress on the trail. Kids enjoy tracking their progress, and if you bring a paper map and compass, they might even enjoy playing the explorer and following the trail. Maybe even put them in charge of being the navigator.
  2. First Aid Kit Nothing will derail a family-friendly hike than a scrape or cut that doesn’t receive the proper care of a bandaid.
  3. Sun Protection Don’t forget the sunscreen, lip balm, hats, and sunglasses.
  4. Headlamp or Flashlight Not only is one of these good to have in case of emergency, but they can be great motivators to have your child flash the light on cool things they find out on the trail or to explore tiny nooks.
  5. Nutrition Not only will this keep their energy up, but fun snacks are always a great motivator!
  6. Hydration. Always bring more than you need. Find what worked best for you. Some people prefer water bottles, others hydration reservoirs with tubes so you can sip along the way. Regardless, it’s always a good idea to have your child help carry their own snacks and water so they can access them easily. the added benefit for littles is this makes them feel so grown up carrying their own backpack.
  7. Matches or firestarter
  8. Multitool or knife
  9. Extra Clothing Make sure you have a jacket in case the weather makes a sudden turn, and it starts to rain, or the wind picks up.
  10. Emergency Shelter A bivy is a space blanket shaped like a sleeping bag. You can get these for about $5 on amazon.
Jenny’s Slot Canyon in Snow Canyon State park is a perfect first time adventure at .3 miles.

Teach Responsible Stewardship

As we enjoy all these beautiful places we want to teach the next generation to recreate responsibly so we can care for the land and they remain pristine. Teach your children to stay on the trail, pack out all trash and waste, respect wildlife, don’t mark up trees or rocks or pick the wildflowers. You can learn more about the seven principles of Leave no Trace at lnt.org

26 Family-Friendly Utah Hikes

Looking for salamanders in Cecret Lake.

Northern Utah

Lower Bell Canyon Reservoir

Fall Evening at Lower Bell Canyon Reservoir

Lower Bell Canyon Reservoir via Larry’s Trail

 A beautiful tree-lined reservoir comes into view after less than a mile of hiking with valley views. The loop around the reservoir will take you through aspen forest, with a bridge crossing over.

Trailhead: Granite Trailhead

Distance: 2.4-mile loop with 495 ft. elevation gain

Other Trail Information: Bathrooms at the trailhead. No dogs because of the watershed.

Best Seasons: Year-round, Spikes suggested for winter hiking.

Bear Canyon Suspension Bridge

Bear Canyon Suspension Bridge in Draper, Utah

Bear Canyon Suspension Bridge via the Bonneville Shoreline Trail

The joy of this hike is it starts at a park. Nothing like some playground time at the end of a hike to motivate the littles on the return. Other highlights along the way include a wooden bridge over Little Willow Creek, a Rock Tunnel, and sweeping views of the Salt Lake Valley, Antelope Island, and the Oqquirh Mountains. Alternatively, a shorter route starts the Orsen Smith Trailhead but is steeper and doesn’t have the fun features of the Bonneville Shoreline Trail route.

Trailhead: Hidden Valley Park in Draper, Utah

Distance: 3.3 miles RT with 508 ft. elevation gain

Other Trail Information: Bathrooms at the trailhead. No dogs because of the watershed.

Best Seasons: Fall and Spring. It can be really hot in summer unless you go early when the mountain shades the trail.

Donut Falls

Donut Falls from within the cave

This is arguably one of the most popular trails in the area for a good reason. This family-friendly gem pays off with a scenic river and beautiful cascades after a relatively easy hike. Caution and experience are advised if you choose to navigate up the slippery rocks to enter and view the falls coming through the “donut hole” hole in the small cave-like dome.

Trailhead: Mill D North off Hwy 190 in Big Cottonwood Canyon

Distance: 3 miles roundtrip with 498 ft. elevation gain

Other Trail Information: Bathrooms at the trailhead. Dogs are not permitted.

Upper Farmington Canyon

Caution is advised if you use the rope to go to the Upper Farmington Canyon Falls base.
The 2nd Car Wreck is my favorite.

Hiking Upper Farmington Canyon is a whole adventure! It is also locally known as the Car Graveyard hike because of the 6+ car wrecks that can be found hidden in the trees along the trail. They toppled from the road high above. Some of the wrecks are probably from the early 1900s. Also on this trail is a small cave and two creek crossings with smaller cascades! Make sure you follow the social paths after the creek crossing so you don’t miss any wrecks. All that in the 1 1/2 miles before you even reach the falls! You’ll hear the falls near the trail’s end before you see them. Going to the base of the falls requires negotiating a steep hillside with the aid of a rope. Proceed at your own risk.

Trailhead: First hairpin turn on Farmington Canyon Road, Farmington, Utah

Distance: 3 miles roundtrip with 948 ft. elevation gain

Other Trail Information: No bathrooms. Dogs Permitted.

Best Season: Year-round. Add 2 miles in winter because the gate is closed.

Lisa falls

Lisa Falls in June

Lisa falls is accessible to just about anyone. At a mere .3 miles for the road, you can bring a picnic and make an afternoon out of it. What makes these falls so fascinating is the sharp turn the water takes part way down and then how the water divides and cascades down the rock. One side of the fall gushes, while the other side just slides down the rock. It’s just mesmerizing to watch.

Trailhead: Opposite the Little Cottonwood Creek Trailhead up between mileposts 6 and 7 in Little Cottonwood Canyon. Park on the left side of the road.

Distance: .3 miles round trip with 121 ft elevation gain

Other Trail Information: No swimming or wading or dogs (watershed). No bathrooms at the trailhead.

Best Season: Best viewed in spring while runoff is flowing but open until Mid November. Never hike this in winter because of avalanche danger.

Paper Airplane Trail

Paper Airplane Trail

What could be cooler than Top of the world views and a larger-than-life paper airplane sculpture?

Trailhead: Just off Horizon Run Road at the Powder Mountain Ski Resort in Eden, Utah

Distance: 1-mile loop with 246 ft. elevation gain

Other Trail Information: No bathrooms at the trailhead.

Best Season: Late June to End of September

Gloria Falls

Multi-tiered Gloria Falls

Gloria Falls is also located in Little Cottonwood Canyon. Another local favorite, you won’t have the trail to yourself, but it’s a favorite for a good reason, and you don’t want to miss it. You’ll first descend a short walk down to the river and cross a bridge over the roaring Little Cottonwood Creek. Then you’ll climb for about a mile, where you’ll see signs right before the trail appears to dead end at the creek. Just past the sign for White Pine Lake, you’ll see a sign for Red Pine Lake. Follow that trail over the bridge and immediately take a left following the social trail to the falls.

Trailhead: Park in the White Pine Trailhead 5.3 miles up Little Cottonwood Canyon

Distance: 2.8 miles round trip with 584 ft. elevation gain

Other Trail Information: No swimming or wading or dogs (watershed). Bathrooms at the trailhead.

Best Season: Spring through Fall. The Falls become buried by snow in the winter.

Ruth Lake

Reflections on Ruth Lake

Ruth Lake is the perfect hike for families. At only two miles roundtrip, everyone can enjoy the satisfaction of reaching a destination after only one mile of hiking. Once you reach the lake, you can enjoy the day on the water, fishing, floating, hanging in your hammock, and even a picnic before heading back to your car blissed out by your afternoon spent by this alpine lake.

Trailhead: Ruth Lake Trailhead off Highway 150 35 miles east of Kamas.

Distance: 2 miles RT with 285 ft. elevation gain.

Other Trail Information: Bathrooms, Dogs are permitted on leash. $6 Fee or free with your National Parks Pass.

Best Season: Highway 150 typically opens in mid-June until the snow falls (Check with UDOT for up top date conditions)

Tony Grove Lake Nature Trail

Tony Grove Lake

Tony Grove Lake Nature Trail is just bursting with wildflowers at peak season. The trail is a little rocky and trickier to negotiate for a short section on the far side of the lake. Come for the day and bring a picnic. There are six picnic sites in the area. You can also float or fish on the water after your hike!

Trailhead: Tony Grove Lake Day Use Area in Logan Canyon

Distance: 1.3 miles loop with 59 ft elevation gain.

Other Trail Information: Bathrooms, Dogs are permitted on leash. $10 Fee or free with your National Parks Pass.

Best Season: Opens in July until the snow falls.

Moonshine Arch

Moonshine Arch

Moonshine Arch really has it all for kids some small caves, a grotto, a fun echo, and they can walk on top of the arch! (Watch your littles on this one it’s narrow up there) make sure to plan plenty of time for this one because once the kids get there, they’ll want lots of time to explore.

Trailhead: 6.5 miles outside Vernal pullout off Highway 191. Use directions from Alltrails or this brochure.

Distance: 2 miles roundtrip with 252 ft. gain

Other Trail Information: No bathrooms at the trailhead. Dogs are permitted. I suggest bringing a downloaded map or the brochure because the trail is not marked.

Best Season: Spring or Fall Can hike in summer or winter just be prepared for the weather and trail conditions.

Battle Creek Falls

Be sure to stand under the spray at Battle Creek Falls.

This hike is moderate difficulty but short. You’ll know you’re almost there after the wide path crosses the footbridge. After you enjoy the falls from the base, make sure you take the trail to the top of the falls for the incredible view of the valley and Utah lake below.

Trailhead: Dead End of Battle Creek Drive in Alpine, Utah.

Distance: 1.6 miles roundtrip with 606 ft. gain (for both top and bottom of falls)

Other Trail Information: Bathrooms are available in the nearby park; dogs are permitted.

Best Season: Year-round. Early spring is best for wildflowers and big flows. Bring spikes in winter.

Stewart Falls

Do you see me standing at the base of the first tier of Stewart Falls?

Another crowd-pleaser of a hike, this trail rolls through aspen groves and pines with views of majestic Mount Timpanogos and the Sundance Ski Resort before you round the bend to view the 200-foot, two-tiered cascade. After you enjoy the overlook, proceed down the switchbacks for an up-close view of these spectacular falls. The kids love to play in the spray of the falls.

Trailhead: Aspen Grove Trailhead or Ride the lift at Sundance Ski resort and take their trail.

Distance: 3.4 miles roundtrip with 930 ft. elevation gain

Other Trail Information: $6 forest service fee (or free with your national parks pass),

Bathrooms at the trailhead. Dogs permitted.

Best Season: Spring is best for wildflowers and big flows. Hiking in winter is not advised due to avalanche danger.

Wall Lake

Wall Lake is popular with families for paddling and cliff jumping.

Wall lake is named after the tall Granite Wall lining one side of the lake. There is a shelf on this wall that is popular with cliff jumpers (at your own risk). It is also a popular spot for fishing, kayaking and stand up paddle boards because of its large size and mountain views and clear water.

Trailhead: Park at the Crystal lake trailhead off Hwy 150. (Make sure to follow the sign to Wall lake since this parking area has multiple trailheads.)

Distance:  2.5 miles roundtrip with 147 ft. elevation gain

Other Trail Information: $6 forest service fee (or free with your national parks pass),

Bathrooms at the trailhead. Dogs permitted.

Best Season: Whenever Hwy 150 opens (typically mid to late June) until the snow flies. Usually October.

Silver Lake Loop

Autumn at Silver Lake

Probably the best thing about hiking the Silver Lake Loop (Besides the gorgeous views, water, and wildlife sightings) is the accessibility. Besides the boardwalk, wide packed gravel makes this trail appropriate for those with mobility issues. Enjoy your walk around the water and stay to fish, extend your hike to other nearby lakes, enjoy the naturalist displays in the visitors center, anus use one of the picnic sites for lunch. The tiny Brighton store just across the street sells food and ice cream if you are looking for a post-hike treat!

Fishing at Silver Lake

Trailhead: Silver Lake Visitors Center at the top of Big Cottonwood Canyon.

Distance: .9 miles roundtrip with 55 ft. elevation gain

Other Trail Information: Bathrooms at the trailhead. Picnic tables. No dogs because of the watershed.

Best Season: June-October. Winter for snowshoeing and cross-country skiing.

Cecret lake

Fireweed blooms and mountain reflections at Cecret Lake

Cecret lake (Yes, it’s spelled that way) is not a secret, but this popular hike is worth the effort for the beautiful lake that sits hidden in a bowl surrounded by breathtaking mountain peaks. Keep your eye out for moose on the trail and salamanders in the water.

Trailhead: Cecret Lake Campground Trailhead at the top of Little Cottonwood Canyon.

Distance: 1.8 miles roundtrip with 465 ft. elevation gain

Other Trail Information: $10 amenity fee (goes towards road and trailhead maintenance)

Bathrooms at the trailhead. No dogs because of the watershed.

Best Season: July through September (when the road to the trailhead is open.)

Southern Utah Hikes

Corona Arch

Corona Arch is every bit as impressive as Delicate Arch but 1/3 of the miles.

Not only is Corona arch a kid-friendly hike but you don’t need to obtain a timed-entry permit to see is because it is outside Arches National Park. You’ll climb ladders and moki steps (steps carves into rock) and across a wide sandstone shelf and two “smaller” arches to reach this impressive arch.

Trailhead: Corona Arch Trailhead 10 miles down Hwy 279.

Distance: 2.5 miles RT with 482 ft elevation gain

Other Trail Information: No fees, Toilets across the street at the gold bar campground. Dogs on leash permitted.

Best Season: Year-round but hot in summer.

Kanab Sand Caves

Kanab Sand Caves is a Child’s playground.

These manmade caves have 6 arch openings to views of the surrounding area. Kids love the scramble up the sandstone to access the caves.

Trailhead: Pullout off of Hwy 89 five miles north of Kanab.

Distance: .5 miles RT with 124 ft elevation gain

Other Trail Information: No fees, Dogs on leash permitted.

Best Season: Year-round but hot in summer. Can be icy in winter.

Red Reef Trail

Negotiating the Moki Steps with the aid of a rope on the Red Reef Trail.

This short hike has slot sections, moki steps, alcoves to explore, and feels like a playground amid the red rock of Southern Utah. After storms there may be waterfalls and water in the waterpockets like the one pictured above. It’s hot here in the summer, so if you choose to visit then go early.

Trailhead: Day Use Parking area in the Red Cliffs Campground. The campground is found in the Red Cliffs Conservation area 15 minutes north of St. George, Utah

Distance: 2.2 miles RT with 223 ft elevation gain

Other Trail Information: $5 fee payable by cash or check or free with a national parks pass, Toilets across at the campground. Dogs on leash permitted.

Best Season: Year-round but hot in summer.

Maple Box Canyon and Arch

Towering walls and rock climbers await in Mable Box Canyon.

This is really two different hikes but their both short and close together so it worth tackling them both on the same day. Fall is a gorgeous time to visit with red and orange leaves against the rock walls. These hikes are fascinating because unlike the usual sand stone walls in a slot or an arch these features or made of multicolor conglomerate rock!

Trailhead: Day use parking area up Maple Canyon near Fountain Green, Utah for the Arch. Make sure to take the Middle Fork trail. For the Maple Box Canyon there is an unmarked pullout about 1 mile up Maple Canyon.

Distance: Maple Canyon Arch: 1.6 miles RT with 580 ft elevation gain, Maple Box Canyon 1 miles RT with minimal gain.

Other Trail Information: $5 fee payable by cash or check or free with a national parks pass, Toilets at the Middle Fork Trailhead. Dogs on leash permitted.

Best Season: Year-round but hot in summer.

Kanarra Falls

Upper Falls in the Kanarra Slot Canyon.

The first time I hiked this canyon was during a family reunion before the hike was permitted. There were 20 of us and the youngest was 4. Once we got past the initial section of the trail and to the water, the kids practically ran up the trail. They loved walking through the water and “discovering” what was around the the next bend between the towering red rock walls. Make sure you have sturdy hiking or water shoes. And never enter a slot if there is a chance of flood. Check local weather here.

Trailhead: End of 100 North in Kannaraville, Utah

Distance: 3.7 miles RT with 753 ft elevation gain

Other Trail Information: $12 permit per person (part of the fees benefit Utah schools!) You can obtain the permits here. Plan ahead. They go fast. Please make sure to read all the notices on the website carefully. No dogs

Best Season: Year-round but hot in summer. Not advisable in winter.

Sheets Gulch/Slot

This hike is an adventure for kids. They love finding the petrified would strewn throughout the canyon and there are fun obstacles to climb as you proceed up the canyon. Located off the Notom Road in Capitol Reef National, Sheets Gulch is a long one, but you can just hike as long as you think your group would enjoy and then return the way you came.

Trailhead: Signed pull out 21.5 miles down Notom Road

Distance: 13.8 miles RT with 757 feet elevation gain

Other Trail Information: No fees, no toilets, no dogs (but loads of adventure!)

Best Season: Year-round but hot in summer. Best times are Spring and Fall.

Strike Valley Overlook

On a clear day you can see all the way to Lake Powell from the Strike Valley Overlook

Even the drive to get to this trailhead is a beautiful adventure. There are three arches along the spur road so have the kids see who can spot them first. Once you arrive at the trailhead follow the signs to the Strike Valley Overlook. Look for the cairns (stacked rocks) that mark the trail. Please, please, please stay on the trail so not to destroy the cryptobiotic soil its an important organism for the desert ecosystem. Also don’t build cairns. It can cause other hikers to lose the trail and get lost.

Trailhead: End of Upper Muley Twist Spur Road (4WD with high clearance advised) off the Burr Trail Road.

Distance: .6 miles RT with 100 ft elevation gain. If you need to walk the spur road its 6.2 miles.

Other Trail Information: No fees, No toilets or water. No dogs.

Best Season: Year-round but hot in summer.

Cohab Canyon

Cohab Canyon is nature’s playground for kids.

Cohab Canyon has some stellar overlooks over Capitol Reef National Park, hoodoos, and short-side slot canyons. It’s a playground for kids to climb and explore. Don’t forget to stop at the historic Gifford Farmhouse afterward for homemade pies and ice cream.

Trailhead: Cohab Canyon has two trailheads. If you have two vehicles, I would park one at each end, then start at the trailhead across from the Park Campground, do the short climb, then all downhill to the Highway 24 trailhead (1.5 miles). If you only have one car park in the Hickman Bridge parking lot off Highway 24, hike uphill while the kids’ legs are fresh. When you reach the top of the trail, take in the views but don’t go down to the campground trailhead. Return the way you came.

Distance: As a through hike (with 2 cars), 1.5 miles with 574 ft gain or 3 miles RT with 794 ft elevation gain.

Other Trail Information: Bathrooms at the Hickman Bridge trailhead. No dogs.

Best Season: Year round

Mill Creek Waterfall and Swimming hole

Swimming in Millcreek Canyon (Moab)

Head up the canyon. Cross the stream a few times and be prepared to get wet swo=imming at this oasis in the desert below the falls. (Keep an eye out for poison ivy.)

Trailhead: Dirt pull out at the end of Powerhouse Lane in Moab, Utah Directions here.

Distance: 1.8 miles RT with 65 ft elevation gain

Other Trail Information: No fees, No vehicles longer than 22 ft down the road to the trailhead. Dogs on leash permitted.

Best Season: Year-round but hot in summer.

Lower Calf Creek Falls

Make sure to wear your swimsuits so you can take a dip in the swimming hole at the base of Lower Calf Creek Falls.

Six miles round trip is long but doable for most kids. Just make sure it is not their first hike! To reach this swimming hole oasis under the 126 ft falls, you hike 3 miles (one way) following the creek under the towering sandstone walls. Interpretive signs along the route draw your attention to the area’s flora, fauna, and history. It’s always fun for the kids to hunt for the signs to see who can find the next one first. Keep an eye out for the Pictographs! You know you’re getting close when the trail begins to surround you with greenery. The trail is sandy much of the way, so don’t forget to bring your swimsuit. You’ll want to enjoy a cool dip after this warm hike.

Trailhead: Park in the lot near the Calf Creek Campground off UT-12, 11 miles south of Boulder and 15 miles east of Escalante ($5 fee). Go early. The lot fills up quickly.

Distance: 6.7 miles with 866 ft elevation gain.

Other Trail Information: Dogs on leash permitted. Bathrooms at the trailhead.

Best Season: Year-round. But it can be cold in winter.

So which hike would you like to try first. I’d love to hear why in the comments.

Looking for more Utah Gems check out my Ultimate Insider’s Guide to Capitol Reef National Park. It’s our favorite Utah National Park and has so many kid friendly hikes!

Want more Uintas hikes? Check out Day Hiking the Uinta Mountains.

Utah’s Best Waterfall Hikes

Upper Kanarra Fallss cascade
 over rock ledge
Upper Kanarra Falls

Did you know that Utah has more than 100 waterfalls? It may not be the first thing you think of in a place world-renowned for its rock formation-filled national parks, but there are myriads of great cascade-filled hikes just waiting for you to chase those falls. So scroll down to read about more than 16 of the best waterfall hikes in Utah. You don’t want to miss a single one.

What to wear on a Waterfall hike

Lower Calf Creek Falls

I just love the feeling of the cooling mist on my face after hiking to a waterfall. Still, while you may be warm or even hot while on your hike, the area around a waterfall may be significantly cooler because of the water and Utah’s low humidity. It’s a good idea to bring layers such as a lightweight, long-sleeved shirt or a waterproof jacket when hiking to Utah’s waterfalls.

No one likes to get a blister out on the trail, so waterproof hiking shoes can make or break your experience. If you are hiking trails like Kanarra Falls, when walking through is unavoidable, a good neoprene hiking sock with either a sandal in warmer weather or shoes in cooler weather will keep your feet from getting too cold. As always, when out on the trail, you always want to pack your ten essentials.

Kanarra Falls

The Best Waterfall Hikes in Utah

Now on to the good stuff! Please remember as you are exploring the outdoors to Leave No Trace so these places can remain pristine and enjoyable for you and everyone. Not familiar with the seven principles of Leave No Trace, you can learn more about Leave No Trace here.

Bell Canyon Lower Falls

Craggy cliffs glow during golden hour above Lower Bell Canyon Falls.

This trail has more than just the falls: a beautiful tree-lined reservoir comes into view after less than a mile of hiking with valley views. After you pass the reservoir and go through a meadow, you cross the creek and enter the pine-filled craggy granite canyon. The final quarter-mile climbs steeply before you are rewarded with a cool respite under the falls opposite another beautiful view of the Oqquirh Mountains and the Salt Lake Valley.

Trailhead: Granite Trailhead

Distance: 5.1 miles roundtrip with 1,492 ft. elevation gain

Other Trail Information: Bathrooms at the trailhead. No dogs because of the watershed.

Best Seasons: Year-round, but spring has the largest flows.

Donut Falls

Donut Falls

This is arguably one of the most popular trails in the area for a good reason. This family-friendly gem pays off with a scenic river and beautiful cascades after a relatively easy hike. Caution and experience are advised if you choose to navigate up the slippery rocks to enter and view the falls coming through the “donut hole” hole in the small cave-like dome.

Trailhead: Mill D North off Hwy 190 in Big Cottonwood Canyon

Distance: 3 miles roundtrip with 498 ft. elevation gain

Other Trail Information: Bathrooms at the trailhead. Dogs are not permitted.

Upper Farmington Canyon Falls

Upper Farmington Canyon Falls in Spring.

Hiking Upper Farmington Canyon is a whole adventure! It is also locally known as the Car Graveyard hike because of the 6+ car wrecks that can be found hidden in the trees along the trail. They toppled from the road high above. Some of the wrecks are probably from the early 1900s. Also on this trail is a small cave and two creek crossings with smaller cascades! Make sure you follow the social paths after the creek crossing so you don’t miss any wrecks. All that in the 1 1/2 miles before you even reach the falls! You’ll hear the falls near the trail’s end before you see them. Going to the base of the falls requires negotiating a steep hillside with the aid of a rope. Proceed at your own risk.

Trailhead: First hairpin turn on Farmington Canyon Road

Distance: 3 miles roundtrip (winter distance) with 948 ft. elevation gain

Other Trail Information: No bathrooms. Dogs Permitted

Best Season: Year-round. Add 2 miles in winter because the gate is closed.

Lisa Falls

These unique falls cascade part way and then take a sharp turn on the Cliff.

Lisa falls is accessible to just about anyone. At a mere .3 miles for the road, you can bring a picnic and make an afternoon out of it. What makes these falls so fascinating is the sharp turn the water takes part way down and then how the water divides and cascades down the rock. One side of the fall gushes, while the other side just slides down the rock. It’s just mesmerizing to watch.

Trailhead: Opposite the Little Cottonwood Creek Trailhead up between mileposts 6 and 7 in Little Cottonwood Canyon. Park on the left side of the road.

Distance: .3 miles round trip with 121 ft elevation gain

Other Trail Information: No swimming or wading or dogs (watershed). No bathrooms at the trailhead.

Best Season: Best viewed in spring while runoff is flowing but open until Mid November. Never hike this in winter because of avalanche danger.

Gloria Falls

The many tiers of Gloria Falls really gush in spring.

Gloria Falls is a family-friendly hike also located in Little Cottonwood Canyon. Another local favorite, you won’t have the trail to yourself, but it’s a favorite for a good reason, and you don’t want to miss it. You’ll first descend a short walk down to the river and cross a bridge over the roaring Little Cottonwood Creek. Then you’ll climb for about a mile, where you’ll see signs right before the trail appears to dead end at the creek. Just past the sign for White Pine Lake, you’ll see a sign for Red Pine Lake. Follow that trail over the bridge and immediately take a left following the social trail to the falls.

Trailhead: Park in the White Pine Trailhead 5.3 miles up Little Cottonwood Canyon

Distance: 2.8 miles round trip with 584 ft. elevation gain

Other Trail Information: No swimming or wading or dogs (watershed). Bathrooms at the trailhead.

Best Season: Spring through Fall. The Falls become buried by snow in the winter.

Lower Calf Creek Falls

Would you take a dip in the swimming hole below Lower Calf Creek Falls?

Many consider Lower Calf Creek Falls the Jewel of Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument. To reach this swimming hole oasis under the 126 ft falls, you hike 3 miles (one way) following the creek under the towering sandstone walls. There are interpretive signs along the route drawing your attention to the area’s flora, fauna, and history. Keep an eye out for the Pictographs! You know you’re getting close when the trail begins to surround you with greenery. The trail is sandy much of the way, so don’t forget to bring your swimsuit. You’ll want to enjoy a cool dip after this warm hike.

Trailhead: Park in the lot near the Calf Creek Campground off UT-12, 11 miles south of Boulder and 15 miles east of Escalante ($5 fee). Go early. The lot fills up quickly.

Distance: 6.7 miles with 866 ft elevation gain.

Other Trail Information: Dogs on leash permitted. Bathrooms at the trailhead.

Best Season: Year-round. But it can be cold in winter.

Upper Calf Creek Falls

The green oasis at Upper Calf Creek Falls.

If solitude is more your jam and you’re an experienced hiker, you might prefer Upper Calf Creek Falls. Although the hike is shorter, the trail descends quickly down for a mile before reaching the falls. Follow the cairns. After enjoying the 86 ft tall falls (watch out for poison ivy), ascend the side trail up to the smaller cascade and deeper pools above the main falls.

Trailhead: Head north from pull off the side road on your left just after milepost 81. Follow the road to the parking area.

Distance: 2.1 miles with 695 ft elevation gain.

Other Trail Information: Dogs on leash permitted.

Best Season: Year-round. But it can be cold and icy in winter.

Hidden Falls

Hidden Falls in Winter.

This trail is accessible to most because of the distance. This hidden grotto really is a treat, so don’t miss it.

Trailhead: Mill B (right by the Lake Blanche Trailhead)

Distance: .3 miles roundtrip with 49 ft elevation gain (I highly recommend continuing another mile to the overlook of Big Cottonwood Canyon and the Salt Lake Valley below.)

Other Trail Information: Bathrooms at Lake Blanche Trailhead nearby. No Dogs.

Best Seasons: Year-round.

Adam’s Canyon Waterfall

Enjoying the cooling mist of Adam’s Canyon Falls.

Located in Kaysville, just off Highway 89, you start this hike in full sun before you enter the canyon and follow the stream all the way to the falls. Despite climbing steeply at times, this trail is a local favorite. If you prefer solitude on the trail, make sure to hike this one early. These 40-foot falls are reliably beautiful year-round. If you want to know more about hiking this one in the winter, check out my post about the 8 Best Frozen Waterfalls in Northern Utah post. This is a great one for those who like to hike with their dogs.

Trailhead: Adams Canyon Trailhead (Looks like a big park and ride lot)

Distance: 4.2 miles roundtrip with 1,358 ft. elevation gain.

Other Trail Information: No bathrooms at the trailhead. Dogs permitted.

Best Seasons: Year-round.

Little Deer Creek Falls

Climbing up the side of Little Deer Creek Falls.

Located adjacent to Cataract Gorge, Little Deer Creek Falls stands over 100 feet tall! The Cataract Gorge is full of swimming holes (bring your swimsuit) that make for a perfect summer retreat in the high Uintas mountains. This really is one of the most beautiful places in the Uintas. While not unknown, it is much quieter than many other places off Highway 150. If you have high clearance 4×4, you can drive right up to this area. Otherwise, it requires a 7-mile roundtrip hike adjacent to the Jeep road. It is well worth the effort for this gorgeous spot. Bonus: If you love camping, there are many great dispersed camping spots in this area. To access the falls, take FR 137 and then FR 027 until you arrive. You can’t miss it.

Trailhead: Park at the Junction of FR137 and FR 027 (there are pullouts)

Distance: 7.5 miles RT with 1,200 ft elevation gain (you climb up on the way out)

Other Trail Information: $6 or free with your America the Beautiful parks pass. Dogs Permitted. There are no Bathrooms at the trailhead but some at the turn-off to FR137.

Best Season: Starting July through September. Before that, the water is too high, and it’s dangerous.

Archangel Falls

Archangel Falls

The cascading crimson steps of North Creek are located below the legendary Subway in Zion National Park. Consider yourself one of the lucky ones if you’re able to secure a permit to hike this gorgeous canyon under the 500-foot tall walls. Read more about the Subway Hike here.

Trailhead: You’ll obtain directions to the trailhead from the permit office.

Distance: 9.1 miles with 1,305 ft. elevation gain for the entire Subway trail. This is a Hard hike.

Other Trail Information: $5 per person permit fee. No dogs. Bathrooms at the trailhead.

Best Season: Spring and Fall. You will get wet, so plan accordingly for the conditions.

Heugh’s Canyon Falls

Heugh’s Canyon Waterfall sits in a Grotto hidden from the main trail.

If you live in the Salt Lake City area, this makes an excellent after-work hike. At only 3 miles, you’ll still find this trail to be a fun adventure as you hike through trees (wildflowers in the spring!), over a few bridges, and then scramble across a boulder field to reach the falls.

Trailhead: Park just off Wasatch Boulevard at the signed parking (you’ll need to walk through the neighborhood for a short bit to access the actual trailhead.)

Distance: 3.1 miles RT with 1,236 ft elevation gain.

Other Trail Information: Dogs Permitted. No Bathrooms at the trailhead.

Best Season: Year-round. Spring is best for wildflowers and big flows. Bring spikes in winter.

Moss Ledge Waterfall

The upper two tiers of Moss Ledge Falls.

More of a scramble than a hike, you’ll be negotiating around loose rocks and boulders for much of the “trail.” Despite the short distance from the road, these falls have three separate tiers and feel very remote. You are more likely to find solitude on this hike compared to others in the canyon.

Trailhead: Pullout by mile marker 7 in Big Cottonwood Canyon

Distance: .8 miles RT with 559 ft elevation gain.

Other Trail Information: Dogs Permitted. No Bathrooms at the trailhead.

Best Season: Summer and Fall. Do not hike in winter because of avalanche danger or in spring because high water flows make the trail dangerous.

Horsetail Falls

Horsetail Falls in late summer.

The trail to Horsetail Falls is consistently steep but manageable the whole way. You’ll have a few stream crossings along with forest, mountain, and valley views. Just like the falls in upper Farmington Canyon, you’ll have a rope to finish the final descent on the trails to the falls, but this one is a lot less sketchy, in my opinion.

Trailhead: Dry Canyon Trailhead in Alpine, Utah

Distance: 4.4 miles RT with 1,695 ft elevation gain.

Other Trail Information: Dogs Permitted. No Bathrooms at the trailhead.

Best Season: Year-round. Best Flows in Spring.

Battle Creek Falls

Lacy Battle Creek Falls

This moderate but short trail is popular with both families. You’ll know you’re almost there after the wide path crosses the footbridge. After you enjoy the falls from the base, make sure you take the trail to the top of the falls for the incredible view of the valley and Utah lake below.

Trailhead: Dead End of Battle Creek Drive in Alpine, Utah.

Distance: 1.6 miles roundtrip with 606 ft. gain (for both top and bottom of falls)

Other Trail Information: Bathrooms are available in the nearby park; dogs are permitted.

Best Season: Year-round. Early spring is best for wildflowers and big flows. Bring spikes in winter.

Hiker near the base of the upper tier of Stewart Falls.

Another crowd-pleaser of a hike, this trail rolls through aspen groves and pines with views of majestic Mount Timpanogos and the Sundance Ski Resort before you round the bend to view the 200-foot, two-tiered cascade. After you enjoy the overlook, proceed down the switchbacks for an up-close view of these spectacular falls.

Trailhead: Aspen Grove Trailhead or Ride the lift at Sundance Ski resort and take their trail.

Distance: 3.4 miles roundtrip with 930 ft. elevation gain

Other Trail Information: $6 forest service fee (or free with your national parks pass),

Bathrooms at the trailhead. Dogs permitted.

Which hike is your favorite? I’d love to hear about it in the comments.

Looking for more hike ideas in Northern Utah? Check out Day Hikes in the Uintas Mountains

Utah’s Best Wildflower Walks and Hikes

July brings peak wildflower season to the high alpine meadows of Utah. What more can make your heart want to sing than strolling through fields bursting with the colors and scents of these wild blooms? Whether you prefer an easy stroll or miles of hiking in solitude, you’ll find just the right place to take in all the wildflowers your heart desires. This post will cover Utah’s 7 best wildflower hikes and walks starting from the north to the south.

Tips for your best visit

Visit at Peak Bloom Times

To ensure the best peak blooms, I use two tools as a guide to help me to determine the best time to visit. First are the dates of the Wasatch Wildflower Festival. This free event offers guided hikes in both Big and Little Cottonwood Canyons near Salt Lake City. The festival dates vary by year, determined by the weather patterns of that year. Second, consult the comment section of your favorite hiking app to see what people are saying about local conditions. Generally, you’ll want to plan for about mid-July for peak blooms.

Observe Leave No Trace Principles

Alpine meadows and trails are fragile environments. Wildflower fields and meadows take many years to establish and thrive. Observing all seven principles of leave no trace will ensure that everyone can enjoy these blooms for years to come, and the ecosystems that thrive off them can stay healthy. Most importantly, don’t pick the wildflowers. In some places, it is even illegal to do so. Stay on the trails, so we don’t trample the flowers. Learn more about leave no trace.

Be Prepared

The weather in high alpine environments can change quickly. Always check the forecast before you go and be prepared for rain as thunderstorms can move in quickly, especially in the afternoons. As with any hiking adventure, always carry your 10 essentials. As to what to wear, I typically like to wear a tank top, bike shorts, and hiking shoes. I always carry a rain jacket and long sleeves in my pack in case the weather changes.

In some places, cell service can be spotty to nonexistent; if you are planning more than a roadside stop, do your research so you are familiar with the trail, or better yet, bring a map, either paper or downloaded from an app such as OnX (my personal favorite), Alltrails, or Gaia GPS.

7 Best Wildflower Hikes and Walks

Wildflowers nestled by the cliff surrounding Tony Grove Lake

Tony Grove Lake

Opening July 1st with wildflower peak season, usually around mid to late July, the Tony Grove Lake day-use area hosts 6 picnic sites and multiple trailheads. Come up and spend an afternoon enjoying your picnic (no campfires in the day-use area), floating on the water, fishing, and hiking the trails. Dogs are permitted on leash. $10 Fee or free with your National Parks Pass.

Wildflowers abound by Utah’s Alpine lakes

Recommended Trails:

Tony Grove Lake Nature Trail (easy) 1.3 miles loop with 59 ft elevation gain.

This family-friendly adventure is just bursting with wildflowers at peak season. The trail is a little rocky and trickier to negotiate for a short section on the far side of the lake.

White Pine Lake (moderate) 7.9 miles RT with 1,391 ft elevation gain.

This hike is the one that made me fall in love with Logan Canyon. You cross stunning fields of wildflowers before you descend down to the lake nestled below Mt. Gog and Magog is the perfect place to spend an afternoon in a hammock in the shade of some trees.

Powder Mountain

Powder Mountain Ski Resort bursts with blooms at peak season

This ski resort offers some great wildflower meadows with top-of-the-world views with a fraction of the crowds you may see at the other locations. All the hiking trails at the resort are free.

Recommended trails:

Paper Airplane Trail (easy) 1-mile loop with 246 ft. elevation gain

Enjoy views of the valley below, and take in the wildflowers and fun installation larger than life paper airplane sculpture.

Brim Trail (moderate) 6.5 miles with loop with 511 ft elevation gain

A perfect mix of flower-filled alpine meadows, aspen and fir groves, and of course, views!

Big Cottonwood Canyon

Wildflower meadow at sunset

The Solitude and Brighton Ski resorts host one of the weekends of the Wasatch Wildflower Festival each year, and for a good reason! There are many trails here of many ability levels that have spectacular bloom displays of many varieties. You can register for free for a guided hike and learn about all the blooms you see here. However, I prefer to always hike one of the local trails here so I can go at my own pace. My favorite trail here is Lake Catherine (4.5 miles) will take you by 4 lakes (if you take the quick pop over to dog lake, too) with a large chance of seeing some moose. Please keep in mind that this canyon is a watershed which means no dogs are allowed (not even in your car) and no swimming or wading in the lakes and streams.

Hillside blooms by Lake Catherine

Recommended trails:

Lake Solitude trail (easy) 3 miles RT with 495 ft elevation gain

Contrary to the name, this hike is popular for a good reason. It’s a beautiful, family-friendly hike.

Brighton Lakes Loop (moderate) 7 miles RT with 1,830 feet elevation gain

Seven lakes in just as many miles. Yes, please. Enjoy the wildflowers among the lake and peak views. You’ll hike through forests, climb rocky paths, and cross boulder fields.

Broads Fork Trail (hard) 5.6 miles RT with 2,041 ft elevation gain

Shares the same trailhead as the iconic Lake Blanche hike but sees a fraction of the visitors. Make sure to get to the trailhead early, and you’ll be rewarded for your climbing with the rushing creek, aspen groves, and fields of blooms nestled under O’Sullivan Peak.

Little Cottonwood Canyon

If you could only choose one place to enjoy wildflowers in Utah, make this your destination. Year after year, the Albion Meadows in Alta, Utah, is just bursting with blooms, not just in quantity but in variety. It’s a rare opportunity to experience these types of blooms with so little effort.

A hike in the Albion Basin of Little Cottonwood Canyon provides the best Wildflowers hiking.

Recommended Trails:

Albion Meadows Trail (easy) 3.6 miles RT with 744 ft gain.

Sound of Music worthy fields with a kaleidoscope of color encircled by the peaks of Big and Little Cottonwood canyons. Extend this adventure by another 1.5 miles to enjoy Cecret Lake (no, that is not a typo).

Mountain reflections and fireweed blooms at Cecret Lake

Mount Wolverine via Twin Lake Pass (moderate) 5.2 miles RT with 2,047 ft elevation gain

This more challenging trail sees a fraction of the visitors of the Albion meadows because of the steep, sometimes loose rock terrain but the rewards of not just the wildflowers but bagging to mountain peaks with views of the Wasatch range and beyond are so sweet.

Mount Timpanogos

Red and Blue blooms thrive in the shadows of Mount Timpanogos

This iconic peak along the Wasatch Front can be accessed by the Alpine Loop Road (Highway 92) which is 20 miles of eye-popping views via some hairpin turns, but you wouldn’t want to rush this drive anyway because of the views. Recreation opportunities abound with Timpanogos Cave National Monument, Tibble Fork reservoir for paddling away from the summer heat, picnicking, camping, off-roading, and of course hiking. There is a $6 fee to use this recreation area. Dogs on leash are permitted.

Recommended trails:

Mount Timpanogos can be accessed by two trailheads. Both offer spectacular displays of wildflowers, waterfalls, and if you are lucky enough mountain goats. If you choose to hike past the falls on either of the below hikes you can hike all the way to the summit or here for 15 miles with 4,425 ft elevation gain or 16.8 miles RT with 5,613 ft elevation gain. Even if you don’t want to hike all the way to the summit, I suggest going a mile or two past the falls for the best displays.

Scout Falls via Mount Timpanogos Trail (moderate) 3 miles with 833 ft gain.

Timpanogos Lower Falls (moderate) 2.4 miles with 774 ft elevation gain.

Big John Flat

Trailside blooms

Most Utah natives haven’t even heard of the Tushar Mountains outside of Beaver, Utah. This is mostly a local’s playground. High above the valley floor up Utah Highway 153 and then 4 miles down forest road 123 you’ll find the meadows of Big John Flat with all their beautiful flowers. The area has dispersed camping, UTV trails, horseback riding, and of course hiking.

Recommended trails:

Mud Lake to Blue Lake (hard) 8.8 miles RT with 2,073 ft gain.

This hike has incredible views, then you descend through fir forest to this incredibly blue water. The climb back out is hard but so worth it. You need bear spray for this one.

Delano Peak (hard) 3 miles RT with 1,650 ft elevation gain.

Enjoy the wildflower meadows at Big John Flat, then get top-of-the-world views from this county’s high point peak.

Cedar Breaks National Monument

Cedar Breaks is like a mini Bryce Canyon at 10,000 ft. They hold their own wildflower festival for two weeks, typically around the last week in June and the first week in July. So after you enjoy the beautiful hoodoos and rare ancient bristle cone pine trees in the amphitheater at the Point Supreme overlook head over to the Alpine Lakes Trail for fireweed and other beautiful blooms. $10 per person or free with your America the Beautiful national parks pass. (Credit cards only)

Wildflower blooms abound around the Alpine Pond trail

Recommended trails:

Alpine Pond Trail (easy) 2.2 miles figure-eight loop with 196 ft gain.

Amphitheater views, wildflowers, and of course the pond views.

Bartizan Arch Trail (moderate) 5 miles RT with 1.148ft.

Ok, you will see a few wildflowers on this one, but the real star of this trail is the amphitheater and bristlecone pine views, Shooting Star waterfall (it thought this was an overstatement), and of course the arch itself. You don’t want to miss this one if you’re already here. Just keep in mind this is a backcountry trail so make sure you have downloaded an offline map.

Do you have plans to see some wildflowers this season let us know where you’d like to go or if you have any questions in the comments.

Other posts you may enjoy

Top Fall Hikes and Drives in Utah

Day Hiking in the Uinta Mountains

The 8 Best Frozen Waterfall Hikes in Utah

Miriam Explores and Hikes is a participant of the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program and other affiliate programs designed to provide a means to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to their specific platforms.

Day Hiking the Uinta Mountains

Northern Utah has so many amazing trails to hike and explore, but when the summer temperatures soar, that’s when I like to escape to the Uinta Mountain Range. With only a short 90-minute drive from downtown Salt Lake City, you can enjoy temperatures 20 degrees (or more) cooler than in the valley. The Uintas are the tallest mountain range in Utah and boast high elevation hiking, over 1000 alpine lakes, wildlife including Utah’s largest population of mountain goats, and the tallest peaks in the state. It’s the perfect place for those looking to bag a few peaks, catch some fish, or paddle to your heart’s content after enjoying some time on the trails.

The Uintas have trails for just about every ability and interest level. Here are 8 trails located off the Mirror Lake Highway (150) for a great day of exploration out of the heat.

Ruth Lake

2 miles RT, 285 ft. gain

Kayaks on Ruth Lake


Ruth Lake is the perfect hike for families. At only two miles roundtrip, everyone can enjoy the satisfaction of reaching a destination after only one mile of hiking. Once you reach the lake, you can enjoy the day on the water, fishing, floating, hanging in your hammock, and even a picnic before heading back to your car blissed out by your afternoon spent by this alpine lake.

Bald Mountain

2.9 miles RT, 1,198 ft. gain

Views from the top of Bald Mountain

I can’t think of a more perfect first-timer peak to bag. It’s challenging enough that you feel like you really accomplished a hike but approachable enough that you can hike it in a few hours. And the VIEWs. This peak has major wow factor, and you’ll have bragging rights with your friends and family. After all, the peak of this mountain is just under 12,000 feet.

Haystack Lake

5.3 miles RT, 387 ft. gain

Haystack Lake in front of it’s namesake mountain.

This hike is really one of the easiest hikes you can do for the distance because there is so little elevation change. For the first mile or so, you hike along the shore of lake Washington enjoying its beauty and the scenic view of Haystack mountain. Next, the trail begins to climb slightly to Shadow lake. For the last mile, you descend down to Haystack lake. Whenever we visited, we had the picturesque lake practically to ourselves. Aah.

Lofty Lake Loop

4.7 mile loop, 981 ft gain

Views From Lofty Pass

Arguably one of the most popular day hikes in the area. The lofty Lakes loop is well worth the hype and not to be missed. You’ll have more elevation gain than on some others, but the views you gain as you crest Lofty Pass to peer down at Cutthroat Lake are well worth the effort. If you have the desire, your can even summit Lofty Peak from the pass. Just follow the “trail” up the boulders to the peak. (I only recommend this part to experienced hikers.)

Fehr Lake

3.9 miles RT, 617 ft. gain

Lily pads on Maba Lake. My favorite on the Fehr Lake Loop

This is another great short hike, but unlike Ruth Lake, you descend down to Fehr Lake on the way in. This means you’ll need to climb back out. The cliffs on the side of Fehr lake are just stunning. If time and energy allow, you can continue on to Shepard (yes, that is the spelling), Hoover, and Maba lakes which are quieter and scenic.

20 Lake Loop

7.3 mile loop, 780 ft gain

Front to back: Twin Lakes, Wall Lake, and Trial Lake

This is one of my favorite hikes in all the Uintas! Not only do you have the mentioned twenty lakes, views of many of the surrounding peaks, but the elevation gain is a mere 780 feet over seven miles. The hike is long enough to give you a great workout or push the little ones, but the relatively little elevation gain helps the miles sail by. It can make for a great backpacking trip, and if you’re really feeling like it, you can bring something to float on the enjoy the serenity at one of the many lakes. Wall or Crystal lakes are popular choices with their proximity to the trailhead, but my personal favorites are Cliff and Three Divide lakes.

Clegg, Notch, and Bench Lakes

6.5 miles RT, 653 ft. gain

Bench Lake

This hike shares the same trailhead as Bald Mountain, and like the Fehr Lake trail, you descend down to the lakes, but with the incredible scenery and gentle grades, as you climb back out, you will hardly notice. I also really enjoy this hike because it is quieter than Lofty Lakes or the 20 Lakes Loop. Most people stop at Notch Lake, but if you continue on to Bench, you’ll have greater chances of having this beauty all to yourself.

Lake Country Trail

4.4 miles-8.4 miles RT, up to 1,107 ft gain.

Weir Lake
Weir Lake

This one is on the long side, but you can choose how many lakes you want to visit and how many miles you’d like to tackle. If you head all the way to Island lake, you’ll be in for 9 miles roundtrip, but you can choose to go only 4-6 miles by visiting either Long or Weir lakes. Weir Lake even has a few hidden waterfalls nearby you can enjoy.

Before you go:

Unlike much of the Wasatch Front, the Uintas are dog friendly, so feel free to bring Fido along.

There is a $6 per day use fee. Bring cash or a check. If you have an America the Beautiful pass, you can use this instead. They do ticket at the trailheads, so make sure to pay the fee and display your receipt to avoid a hefty fine.

As always, when out on the trail, you always want to pack your ten essentials. Mosquitos can be prevalent in June and July, so wear bug spray.

July through September is Utah’s monsoon season, and storms can approach quickly at higher elevations. Stay off the peaks in the afternoons to avoid lightning and hail. It’s a good idea to bring layers such as a lightweight, long-sleeved shirt or a waterproof jacket 

Other posts you may enjoy

Top Fall Hikes and Drives in Utah

Utah’s Best Waterfall Hikes

The 8 Best Frozen Waterfall Hikes in Utah

Miriam Explores and Hikes is a participant of the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program and other affiliate programs designed to provide a means to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to their specific platforms.